Could you be a SPAB Scholar or Fellow?

We’re now searching for SPAB Scholars and Fellows for 2017. Apply for the Scholarship programme and the Fellowship programme by 1 December.

We welcome Fellowship applications from craftspeople employed in the repair of historic buildings on site or in workshops and studios. Candidates must have completed their apprenticeship and demonstrate a high degree of competence, as well as an enthusiasm to engage with other trades and disciplines. Past Fellows have been stonemasons, stained glass conservators, blacksmiths, carpenters/joiners, bricklayers, leadworker and plasterers.

Our Scholars are architects, surveyors and engineers who have completed their college-based training (e.g. RIBA Parts I & II for architects), ideally with a few years experience in their field. Applicants must be enthusiastic about old buildings and willing to travel the country for this nine-month countrywide conservation tour.

scholars-and-fellows-with-stafford-holmes-and-the-line-kiln-at-cat

A word from this year’s Scholars and Fellows:

Triona Byrne, structural engineer
We’re over halfway through the scholarship at this stage and some of the highlights for me have been the traditional practical skills we have been given the opportunity to try. Thatching, earth building and dry stone walling were among my favourites – it’s been brilliant to have the opportunity to learn about things I’ve always admired from afar without a clear idea of how they are actually done. The different approaches to conservation we’ve come across have been really interesting to dissect and debate. They are helping me to shape my own conservation philosophy.

triona-mixing-lime-mortars-at-duart-castle

Triona mixing lime mortars at Duart Castle

Dec Cahill, building surveyor
As we fly into the fifth month of the Scholarship we’ve been to all sides of the country, as well as a great trip to Italy with the Landmark Trust to study Palladio’s Renaissance revival of classical architecture. Along with the various working parties at Great Croxley, Balmerino and Greatham, I have thoroughly enjoyed our time in Cumbria drystone walling and visiting my hometown of Manchester!

paint-conservation-works

At Winchester Cathedral

Thom Evans, stonemason
It is the overwhelming kindnesses shown to us by the hosts that has really amazed me. The educational value of the fellowship is well known within the industry but the friends you make, and the fun you have is difficult to explain to outsiders.
Whether you’re being welcomed by a host for a week – Marianne Suhr, Douglas Kent- or just for a few hours we’ve been made to feel at home. It’s this attitude that has allowed us to ask questions freely and not to feel foolish when we don’t know certain things. A big thanks to anyone who has already helped, or hopes to in the future.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Constructing a newbuild clay dabbin structure in Cumbria

Lizzy Hippisley-Cox, stained glass conservator
Although we are only seven weeks in, the Fellowship has already had an enormous impact on the way I see building conservation, and the way my work fits into the grand scheme. I am getting a much better understanding of other traditional techniques and materials, and the skills involved in mastering them.

The highlights for me have been instances where we have walked around churches (large and small), taking in the detail. There is so much to be said for taking time to look at the historic fabric together, and then talking about what we see from each of our different professional perspectives. It is the process of discussing what has happened to a building, and what the potential outcomes will be over time that has taught me the most so far.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Declan and Gethin trying fresco painting